Immunization

Vaccinations are the safest and most efficient way of protecting you and your family from many serious, and even deadly, diseases.

Many of us are familiar with having our vaccinations at a younger age; however, some vaccines lose effectiveness as we age and the viruses themselves change and become more resistant to past vaccines.

At Premier, we lead your care with prevention. We recommend following the CDC’s immunization guidelines for adults, teens, infants and children.

Note: While there are many locations offering seasonal vaccinations, such as the flu; however, we encourage you to choose Premier for immunization when possible to ensure your health record remains updated.

 

Adult Immunizations (Age 19 and Older)

Age and many other health factors (pregnancy, immune system, etc.) play a role in adult immunization needs. The CDC schedule covers many of the situations but your Premier staff can help you with any questions.

Pediatric Immunization Schedule (Birth – Age 6)

There are 14 dangerous, and even deadly, diseases that are preventable with proper vaccination. Parents can protect their infants and children before the age of two by following the recommended childhood vaccination schedule from the CDC.

 

Preteen and Teen Immunization Schedule (Ages 7-18)

Flu Shot

Get your flu shot. It is never too late on not necessary to get immunized for influenza. While flu season begins in October and usually peaks between December and February at may extend well beyond the winter months into Spring and Summer.

Flu severity is an important consideration that often goes unappreciated. While flu season is inevitable, reducing hospitalizations and fatalities for all ages are largely impacted by the vaccination rate.

Despite an abundance of public speculation on the effectiveness of each year’s vaccine, the flu shot will reduce the risk of contracting the flu and may reduce flu illness severity. Regardless of one’s personal health and wellness, contracting the flu and exposing those who are maybe weaker, such as children and the elderly should be compelling enough to choose annual vaccination.